Hydroponic Technology

Hydroponic is the practice of growing plants without soil. Plants can be grown in plain nutrient solution or in sterile substrates, therefore microbe free. Hydroponics uses less than 1/10th - 1/5th of the water used in soil cultivation.

License available for

  • Lettuce
  • Tomato
  • Capsicum
  • Cucumber
  • Strawberry
  • Mint
  • Basil

The development and use of controlled environment agriculture and hydroponics have enhanced the economic well being of many communities throughout the world and with the trainings and assistance in establishing such project, suitable human resources and entrepreneurs can be developed in India to make hydroponics is a technical reality. Such production systems can produce horticultural crops where field-grown fresh vegetables and ornamentals are not possible or unavailable for much of the year.

Saveer developed hydroponic greenhouse for Hero MotoCorp. Saveer was associated with the project right from the beginning which involved Planning, Designing, Manufacturing, Installation and finally Commissioning of the specially manufactured and designed Hydroponic Greenhouse on the roof tops of the buildings. Read more
This technology to grow produce on urban rooftops can be used in urban environments to improve access to fresh food. Rooftops in industries, residential and service buildings are an ideal location for the use of Hydroponic technology for the production of vegetables on roof top because crops in such greenhouses they have better access to sunlight compared to the ground level. Furthermore, leasing space atop buildings is often cheaper and more available than the same area on the ground and thus can help facilitate this commercial practice.


Potential implementation areas and significance:

  • Residential, industrial and services buildings
  • No requirement of soil and exclusive land for growing crops
  • Resistant to weather related disruptions
  • Potential food production year around
  • Favorable potential environmental benefits
  • Efficient Energy, CO2 and water exchange
  • Symbiotic flows characterization
  • Reduces food miles
  • Potential to represent a key point in the design of low-carbon cities
  • Agronomic practices easy to follow